People

Moderators:

Dirk Eilander

Dirk Eilander

PhD researcher - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Dirk’s PhD research is to improve our understanding of compound flooding in delta areas and its influence on flood risk. To this end a globally applicable nested flood model will be developed. This model will be used to to understand the effect of compound floods on total flood risk and to characterize compound floods and their meteorological drivers.

Anaïs Couasnon

Anaïs Couasnon

PhD researcher - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Anaïs’ PhD research is part of a VIDI project that aims to understand and model compound risk of river and coastal floods in global deltas and estuaries, under the supervision of Dr. Philip Ward and Dr. Hessel Winsemius. Anaïs will use statistical methods and models to assess the probability and impacts of coastal-river compound floods at the global scale.

Nina Ridder

Nina Ridder

Post-Doc - Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut

Nina’s main work is associated to the NWO project Impacted by Compounding Weather Extremes (ICOWEX). In this project, she has investigated coincidences of storm surges along the Dutch coast with heavy precipitation and/or high river discharge events using a broad range of impact models and data sources.

Contributors:

Philip Ward

Philip Ward

Associate Professor - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Philip was awarded in 2017 a NWO VIDI grant to investigate compound risk of river and coastal floods in global deltas and estuaries.

Jakob Zscheischler

Jakob Zscheischler

Postdoc - ETH Zurich

Jakob develops new methods to study compound events. His current research focuses on the assessment of co-occurring droughts and heatwaves, and implications for the carbon cycle.

Hessel Winsemius

Hessel Winsemius

Post-Doc - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Hessel’s main work at the Vrije Universiteit focusses on use of hydrological and hydraulic models in understanding of flood risk at continental scale. He works in a VIDI project on the socioeconomic impacts of compound river and coastal floods.

Emanuele Bevacqua

Emanuele Bevacqua

PhD researcher - University of Graz

Emanuele is trained as a physicist and has conducted his PhD research within the project CE:LLO (Compound Events: muLtivariate statisticaL mOdelling). In this project, based on pair-copula constructions, he developed a multivariate statistical model for downscaling and analysing compound events. He has focused his research on the analysis of compound flooding and drought, both at the local and continental scale. He is interested in understanding the physical processes leading to compound events and to their future changes.

Antonia Sebastian

Antonia Sebastian

Assistant Professor - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Antonia’s research focuses on delineating flood hazards in urbanizing coastal watersheds and the effects of rapidly evolving coastal boundary conditions on the severity of compound floods. Her current research is associated with the the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is joint appointed in the Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program (E3P).

Karin van der Wiel

Karin van der Wiel

Post-Doc - Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute

Karin’s research at KNMI is focused on climate induced impacts. She is investigates how multiple meteorological drivers may interact, compound and result in a single societal impact.

Colin Raymond

Colin Raymond

PhD Researcher -- Columbia University

Colin’s research considers regional and geographic dimensions of extreme heat, and combinations of variables, events, or societal vulnerabilities that lead to climate extremes with cascading impacts. He would like to help develop the research communities and tools to analyze these events in a way that accurately reflects their health, economic, and ecosystem impacts as well as their potential human-system feedbacks.